An open letter to the students and staff of WHHS

WHHS+has+many+structural+issues%2C+but+these+are+complemented+by+student-created+problems.+Litter+is+one+of+these+problems%2C+Martin+argues+in+his+open+letter.
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An open letter to the students and staff of WHHS

WHHS has many structural issues, but these are complemented by student-created problems. Litter is one of these problems, Martin argues in his open letter.

WHHS has many structural issues, but these are complemented by student-created problems. Litter is one of these problems, Martin argues in his open letter.

Caroline Horvath

WHHS has many structural issues, but these are complemented by student-created problems. Litter is one of these problems, Martin argues in his open letter.

Caroline Horvath

Caroline Horvath

WHHS has many structural issues, but these are complemented by student-created problems. Litter is one of these problems, Martin argues in his open letter.

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On Monday, April 8, I had the pleasure of walking through WHHS with a small group of teachers, the President of the Cincinnati Federation of Teachers (CFT) and Scott Adams. Adams is the Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Cincinnati Public Schools. He was here to look at issues that exist in the upkeep of Walnut Hills.
I heard about many of these issues from the students I teach. They include problems related to restrooms, water fountains, damage done by water and too many others to list.
Adams was also taken through the Arts and Science building and made aware of issues that I did not know existed.
The COO was open to listening to the ideas presented and more importantly designing ways to fix and correct the issues that cause consternation amongst the students and I am sure the faculty as well.
This walk-through to me was a culmination of hard work by many people and constant bickering about the state of our school by the author of this piece. I was completely satisfied with what I heard from Adams. He was willing to listen and to talk with the teachers to come up with a plan and a way to make sure the corrections are being done with efficiency and to the satisfaction of all. I was equally glad to see the Supervisor of our area (District Supervisor assigned to our school) at WHHS on April 9, checking out hand dryers that are broken, bathrooms with no soap and even looking at water fountains that do not work.
I suppose the adage that the squeaky wheel gets the oil fits well at this point. It is a good start, but we will see what the future holds.
However, there is one thing that must be stressed. That those of us who work, learn, play and do so many other things in the hallowed halls of this building must be responsible for the environment of the building.
Throwing soap on the floors, defacing the walls, cluttering up the toilets and throwing food on the walls cannot be tolerated. We all must learn to respect the building and to do our part to make it last for another 100 years.
It is up to all to be vigilant against those who wish to trash the school. Remind them, would they do this in their own home? This is the home to so many who have passed through, to those who are here and to those who are still to come.
WHHS is a wonderful building. Its architecture is admired by those who visit. However, as the outside walls show the brilliance of the school, let us all work together to make what is inside as brilliant as the students and staff who work on its inside.

Mr. Martin

Social Studies Teacher

 

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