The Student News Site of Walnut Hills High School

The Chatterbox

The Student News Site of Walnut Hills High School

The Chatterbox

The Student News Site of Walnut Hills High School

The Chatterbox

Polls

What concerts are you planning to go to?

  • Taylor Swift (93%, 14 Votes)
  • Drake (7%, 1 Votes)
  • Morgan Wallen (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Young the Giant (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Ella Mai (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 15

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Rooms to look forward to

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Elena Brown
“Paul Ashbrook painted the murals and they are from the 1930s,” Wolfe said. “His wife taught French in this classroom in the 1930s and supposedly, what I understand, is that each of the panels went along with an epic French poem, which she taught to her French students.”

The standard classroom desk arrangement is in rows and columns. Most classrooms look the same, but there are exceptions, especially here at WHHS. Each teacher decides to decorate their classroom differently and some classrooms stand out among the others.

One of those classrooms is Dawn Wolfe’s. Wolfe is an English teacher and all of the murals on her walls make her classroom special. 

“I like the ambiance of the whole room,” Red Brock, ‘29, said.

Brock thinks they learn better in more unique-looking rooms.

“I like how it makes me pay attention to the teacher,” Brock said.

Jake Riordan and William Schnure also have unique classrooms.

Riordan is an English teacher and his classroom has plants on one wall and a giant pencil sculpture in one corner of the room. Schnure is a science teacher and his classroom is bigger than normal and filled with plants and posters. 

Lucy Reddy, ‘29, prefers to learn in more distinct classrooms.

“It’s really nice to learn when it looks nice,” Reddy said. “My math class does not look nice and it’s really distracting.” 

Reddy would like to see more distinctive-looking classrooms around the school.

“I think that would be good because then I can remember every teacher,” Reddy said.

Brock thinks that teachers who have unique classrooms act differently than regular teachers.

“I think [teachers with cool-looking classrooms] are a lot more enthusiastic,” Brock said.

Kevin McCormick teaches five sections of ninth-grade honors modern world history at WHHS and is a teacher with a unique classroom.

McCormick’s classroom has alternate seating, paintings hung on the walls, rugs on the floor and other antique objects.

“Hopefully, my classrooms are a reflection of the things that I enjoy. I like artwork. I appreciate artifacts and music,” McCormick said. “The idea was to create a comfortable, eclectic environment where students can learn.”

McCormick didn’t choose one day to make his classroom different, it developed organically over time

“I wanted to teach in an environment that I felt comfortable in but also, it seemed like a comfortable place for students to learn as well,” McCormick said, “And, over time I got fairly positive feedback on the comfort level and [it] sort of grew from that.” 

McCormick spends extra money on his classroom and updates it every year.

“Typically, in July and August, I’ll go out antique shopping. I’ll bring artifacts from home or antiques I find at various stores. Each year I tried to add a couple of pieces to [the room],” McCormick said, “Every year [I] do an activity where students are able to choose antiques, artifacts or artwork from the classroom to take home permanently. So I tried to replenish the classroom each year.”

McCormick thinks that whether students learn better in more unique classrooms depends on the student.

“I have not had [a] conversation with anyone who was concerned about remaining focused in the classroom. [But] I’m sure that could be a possibility,” McCormick said, “I [have] had more of a strong response that [my classroom] puts people in a pretty comfortable position where they feel relaxed.”

McCormick wouldn’t recommend making the classroom change.

“I just think it’s a personal decision. Teachers want to cover their content in an environment that speaks to them personally, so I wouldn’t make that recommendation,” McCormick said, “Just know that it works for me and I look forward to every year sort of giving the classroom a personal touch.”

Another unique classroom is Melissa Riggs’. Riggs is a science teacher and her classroom has a lot of plants and lights.

“Her lights are beautiful, [and] it’s a welcoming core when you go in there,” Amia Knight, ‘26, said.

Knight thinks she learns better in rooms like that “because it calming and you can just relax and be yourself.”

Knight would also like more unique-looking classrooms around WHHS.

“I feel like every room should have a little something to add,” Knight said.

One more unique classroom is Samantha Gerwe-Perkins’. Gerwe-Perkins is a journalism teacher and her room is bigger than most. Half of her classroom is a computer lab while the other is a more traditional classroom. Inside the classroom, there are many journalism resources, such as computers, laptops, cameras, lights and recording/audio materials.

SENIOR Dominic Allie prefers special classrooms because “sometimes boring classrooms make [him] fall asleep.”

Allie finds them helpful and would like it if there were more around WHHS.

“I think it would be interesting if other classes like History, Latin or math had more real-world elements in the classrooms,” Allie said.

Knight doesn’t think that teachers who have unique classrooms act differently than regular teachers.

“I think it depends on the [teachers] personality, I wouldn’t necessarily say the class had something to do with it,” Knight said.

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About the Contributors
Iman Divanovic
Iman Divanovic, Peanuts Writer
In her second year as a Chatterbox staff member, freshman Iman Divanovic is excited to work as a Staff Writer. She took News Writing 1 and 2 and wants to produce content that the staff and students at WHHS will find helpful and interesting.   Divanovic also is on the junior varsity soccer team and is in Boo Radley and TSAR Club Divanovic hopes to attend Depauw University and find a job that she loves.  Divanovic enjoys playing soccer with friends and family and getting lost in a good book.
Elena Brown
Elena Brown, Managing Editor of Student Life
In her second year as a Chatterbox staff member, Elena Brown, ‘27 is looking forward to working as a Managing Editor this year. She hopes to become more confident and to become a better writer this year. Brown also plays soccer outside of school. She enjoys hiking and being outside. Brown also loves to read and plays the guitar. While Brown does not have one specific college in mind, she hopes to study environmental science and to eventually have a career that will make an impact.
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