Remembering Stan Lee

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Remembering Stan Lee

Stan Lee was awarded the National Medal of the Arts by President George W. Bush in 2008. In 2011, Lee was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Stan Lee was awarded the National Medal of the Arts by President George W. Bush in 2008. In 2011, Lee was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Courtesy Gage Skidmore/ Flickr

Stan Lee was awarded the National Medal of the Arts by President George W. Bush in 2008. In 2011, Lee was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Courtesy Gage Skidmore/ Flickr

Courtesy Gage Skidmore/ Flickr

Stan Lee was awarded the National Medal of the Arts by President George W. Bush in 2008. In 2011, Lee was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Veteran’s Day is a day to remember those who have served for America. But the public received another reason to reflect this Nov. 11 when the news broke that a veteran of both the army and pop culture, Marvel Comics co-creator, Stan Lee, died at age 95.

Lee is best known for creating some of the most iconic Marvel characters, including the Incredible Hulk, the Fantastic Four and Spider-man. He has connected with many of Marvel’s more contemporary fans by making cameos in every movie in the Marvel Cinematic Universe up to this point.

While Lee’s death might not be as important to the general public as other American figures, most followers of pop culture over the past century take his passing seriously. Lee’s contributions to entertainment changed the way heroes were created, and gave hope to Americans in some of their darkest times.

Marvel created Captain America in 1942 during the height of WWII, bringing hope to those fighting, along with those who knew people who were fighting. Lee took over writing the character after the original creators left, and continued to build Captain America’s image of the all-American superhero. During the Cold War, Lee dreamed up the Incredible Hulk and Iron Man to demonstrate the blessings and curses of heightened technology.

Lee’s creation of Spider-man still resonates with the awkward teenagers of the present, which is why he is still one of the most popular superheroes present today.

Many different celebrities associated with Marvel have spoken about Lee’s death. Hugh Jackman, who played Wolverine in the X-Men series, told Stephen Colbert on The Late Show, “I remember Stan as a true gentleman who had a glint in his eye. He’s a creative genius. He thought outside the box. He created a whole universe that changed the lives of many people, mine included.”

And Robert Downey, Jr., who plays Iron Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, said of Lee on Instagram, “I owe it all to you. Rest in peace, Stan.”

Stan Lee may have passed away, but his creations and his ideas will live on for much longer. Lee’s vision of the teenage superhero relates to many young people around the world, including myself.